We hope our friends in New York will join us tonight for a special National Poetry Month installment of the FSG Reading Series. Rowan Ricardo Phillips (The Ground) and Glyn Maxwell (One Thousand Nights and Counting) will read at the Russian Samovar. I’ve had the privilege of hearing Phillips read before, and I highly, highly recommend experiencing it live.

The Russian Samovar
256 W. 52nd St
7pm

(Facebook details

We’re bringing back everyone’s favorite literary trivia night to McNally Jackson.
Nerd Jeopardy ReturnsPresented by Work in Progress and Small DemonsTuesday, April 17th, 7pmMcNally Jackson, 52 Prince St.New York City 
What Is Nerd Jeopardy?Nerd Jeopardy is just like a certain famous game show, except there are no commercial breaks, no giant cash prizes, and all of the categories are about books.
You can compete in a team of three* against two other teams; the winners will earn the respect of your peers, which we know is impossible to get anywhere else. You can also hang back as an audience member, heckling with abandon. There are assorted prizes either way.
You will leave the event vindicated for majoring in 19th-Century Russian Poetry — and because of the free drinks, you will also leave the event slightly tipsy.
Hosted by Ryan Chapman. All are welcome.
*If you’d like to compete, grab two friends, give yourselves a literary moniker, and drop your name in the hat at the start of the program. We’ll select three teams around 7:10pm. If yours isn’t chosen, don’t fret. You can still participate in the audience quiz at intermission and find solace in the free wine.

We’re bringing back everyone’s favorite literary trivia night to McNally Jackson.

Nerd Jeopardy Returns
Presented by Work in Progress and Small Demons
Tuesday, April 17th, 7pm
McNally Jackson, 52 Prince St.
New York City 

What Is Nerd Jeopardy?
Nerd Jeopardy is just like a certain famous game show, except there are no commercial breaks, no giant cash prizes, and all of the categories are about books.

You can compete in a team of three* against two other teams; the winners will earn the respect of your peers, which we know is impossible to get anywhere else. You can also hang back as an audience member, heckling with abandon. There are assorted prizes either way.

You will leave the event vindicated for majoring in 19th-Century Russian Poetry — and because of the free drinks, you will also leave the event slightly tipsy.

Hosted by Ryan Chapman. All are welcome.


*If you’d like to compete, grab two friends, give yourselves a literary moniker, and drop your name in the hat at the start of the program. We’ll select three teams around 7:10pm. If yours isn’t chosen, don’t fret. You can still participate in the audience quiz at intermission and find solace in the free wine.

From an interview with WIll Hermes, author of Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever:
Q. One thing that, for me, was really striking about [the early 1970s] was that everything was happening underground, as you were saying, but also in the context of a total decline in living standards in New York City, economic decline, the city going bankrupt, the theme you keep going back to of buildings burning down for the insurance money, crime everywhere. What’s the relationship between this pretty grim atmosphere and the explosion of creative, wonderful music at the same time – is there even a connection?
Will Hermes: In some ways it’s a perfect storm of things. Part of the result of the economic collapse of the city during those years was cheap rent, and cheap rent in former manufacturing districts which meant loft spaces that were large enough to rehearse in and for lots of people to live in for very little rent. That was certainly one factor. I think another factor was that the ‘60s had happened, because while people sometimes look at punk or disco or whatever as being complete breaks with the ‘60s, I try to make the point in the book that these movements were direct offshoots of the ‘60s. The first disco parties that David Mancuso and Nicky Siano threw in the early to mid ‘70s were largely fueled by LSD, they were very specifically about peace, love, tolerance, equality. There were mixed crowds, gay, straight, black, white, which was very much coming out of a ‘60s aesthetic sensibility and ideology, although it evolved from there. Punk rock too – Patti Smith and Television, Tom Verlaine, talked about their indebtedness to ‘60s artists whether it be the Doors, Jimi Hendrix, or the Stones, who Patti and Lenny Kaye were championing and sort of bowing down to. Television were huge fans of Coltrane and Albert Ayler and even the Grateful Dead – Tom Verlaine has mentioned that he knew some songs, particularly “Dark Star,” and was very intrigued by that even though he wasn’t a fan of some of their other stuff.
So yes, I think it was part low rent, part the creative ferment of the ‘60s still fermenting, and the other factor is probably just New York – New York is always a magnet for talent and people coming from all over the world to get up on the New York City stage and make an impression, so I think that’s a constant theme of the city.

From an interview with WIll Hermes, author of Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever:

Q. One thing that, for me, was really striking about [the early 1970s] was that everything was happening underground, as you were saying, but also in the context of a total decline in living standards in New York City, economic decline, the city going bankrupt, the theme you keep going back to of buildings burning down for the insurance money, crime everywhere. What’s the relationship between this pretty grim atmosphere and the explosion of creative, wonderful music at the same time – is there even a connection?

Will Hermes: In some ways it’s a perfect storm of things. Part of the result of the economic collapse of the city during those years was cheap rent, and cheap rent in former manufacturing districts which meant loft spaces that were large enough to rehearse in and for lots of people to live in for very little rent. That was certainly one factor. I think another factor was that the ‘60s had happened, because while people sometimes look at punk or disco or whatever as being complete breaks with the ‘60s, I try to make the point in the book that these movements were direct offshoots of the ‘60s. The first disco parties that David Mancuso and Nicky Siano threw in the early to mid ‘70s were largely fueled by LSD, they were very specifically about peace, love, tolerance, equality. There were mixed crowds, gay, straight, black, white, which was very much coming out of a ‘60s aesthetic sensibility and ideology, although it evolved from there. Punk rock too – Patti Smith and Television, Tom Verlaine, talked about their indebtedness to ‘60s artists whether it be the Doors, Jimi Hendrix, or the Stones, who Patti and Lenny Kaye were championing and sort of bowing down to. Television were huge fans of Coltrane and Albert Ayler and even the Grateful Dead – Tom Verlaine has mentioned that he knew some songs, particularly “Dark Star,” and was very intrigued by that even though he wasn’t a fan of some of their other stuff.

So yes, I think it was part low rent, part the creative ferment of the ‘60s still fermenting, and the other factor is probably just New York – New York is always a magnet for talent and people coming from all over the world to get up on the New York City stage and make an impression, so I think that’s a constant theme of the city.

johnjeremiahsullivan

New Yorkers: This will be a very, very memorable literary event. 

johnjeremiahsullivan:

On Friday March 9th, John Jeremiah Sullivan and Geoff Dyer will be in conversation at 192 Books. Here’s Dyer from a recent interview in Bookforum:

Failure is quite interesting, and it’s something I have a certain amount of experience with. I wasn’t a failure in the way lots of people are failures—I could always get published, that was pretty straightforward. Literary failure is funny because it’s not like you get this massive slap in the face and become a figure of ridicule. It’s more that you do this thing, you write this book, and then this big thing is poised to happen on publication. And nothing happens. It’s just a weird non-event. The literary Richter scale doesn’t register any kind of tremor. That was happening to me for a very long while, and then I managed to persuade myself that these serial failures were perhaps a kind of liberation in that it meant I was free from any kind of pressure from publishers. The stakes were so low that it didn’t really make any kind of difference to anybody that I went from writing a novel to writing a book about the First World War.

You can RSVP to the event by calling (212) 255-4022

vikingpenguinbooks
vikingpenguinbooks:

How New York Pay Phones Became Guerrilla Libraries
An interview with the creator
The concept, sponsored by Locke’s imaginary Department of Urban Betterment, is that New Yorkers will pick up unfamiliar titles while running their errands and then, perhaps, replace them the next day with favorite books of their own. That’s in an ideal world. Of the twoguerrilla libraries that the artist has fashioned, one has been used properly while the other has had its entire collection repeatedly ganked by sticky-fingered pedestrians. Its shelves were also stolen.
But Locke has many more libraries planned. With plywood consoles that slip over payphones as neatly as aprons, these sidewalk objets are endlessly replicable. (No doubt they’ll feature in his 2012 Columbia course, “Hacking the Urban Experience.”) I caught up with Locke over the weekend to ask him about what was and wasn’t working with these literary outposts, as well as why he started the project in the first place. 
More at The Atlantic

This is an incredible idea. I’m going to try and find one pronto.

vikingpenguinbooks:

How New York Pay Phones Became Guerrilla Libraries

An interview with the creator

The concept, sponsored by Locke’s imaginary Department of Urban Betterment, is that New Yorkers will pick up unfamiliar titles while running their errands and then, perhaps, replace them the next day with favorite books of their own. That’s in an ideal world. Of the twoguerrilla libraries that the artist has fashioned, one has been used properly while the other has had its entire collection repeatedly ganked by sticky-fingered pedestrians. Its shelves were also stolen.

But Locke has many more libraries planned. With plywood consoles that slip over payphones as neatly as aprons, these sidewalk objets are endlessly replicable. (No doubt they’ll feature in his 2012 Columbia course, “Hacking the Urban Experience.”) I caught up with Locke over the weekend to ask him about what was and wasn’t working with these literary outposts, as well as why he started the project in the first place. 

More at The Atlantic

This is an incredible idea. I’m going to try and find one pronto.