“The story is simple: Boy meets girl; boy marries girl; girl falls ill on their honeymoon with a water lily on the lung, which can only be treated by being surrounded by flowers; boy goes broke desperately trying to keep his true love alive.

First published in 1947, Mood Indigo perfectly captures the feverishly creative, melancholy romance of mid-century Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Recently voted number ten on Le Monde’s list of the 100 Books of the Century (the top ten also included works by Camus, Proust, Kafka, Hemingway, and Steinbeck), Boris Vian’s novel has been an icon of French literature for fifty years—the avant-garde, populist masterpiece by one of twentieth-century Paris’s most intriguing cultural figures, a touchstone for generations of revolutionary young people, a jazz-fueled, science-fiction-infused, sexy, fantastical, nouveau-decadent tear-jerker that has charmed and beguiled hundreds of thousands of readers around the world. With the help of Michel Gondry and Audrey Tautou, it is set to seduce many, many more, as the movie based on the book premieres in the U.S. this summer.”
(Read the first chapter of Mood Indigo)

The story is simple: Boy meets girl; boy marries girl; girl falls ill on their honeymoon with a water lily on the lung, which can only be treated by being surrounded by flowers; boy goes broke desperately trying to keep his true love alive.

First published in 1947, Mood Indigo perfectly captures the feverishly creative, melancholy romance of mid-century Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Recently voted number ten on Le Monde’s list of the 100 Books of the Century (the top ten also included works by Camus, Proust, Kafka, Hemingway, and Steinbeck), Boris Vian’s novel has been an icon of French literature for fifty years—the avant-garde, populist masterpiece by one of twentieth-century Paris’s most intriguing cultural figures, a touchstone for generations of revolutionary young people, a jazz-fueled, science-fiction-infused, sexy, fantastical, nouveau-decadent tear-jerker that has charmed and beguiled hundreds of thousands of readers around the world. With the help of Michel Gondry and Audrey Tautou, it is set to seduce many, many more, as the movie based on the book premieres in the U.S. this summer.”

(Read the first chapter of Mood Indigo)

“The city of Grifonia, Italy, is swarming with secrets—thousands of years of dark, murderous secrets. Taz, a British student who has just arrived for her year abroad, thinks that she will spend her time in Italy sipping wine and taking in the rolling Umbrian hills. But she soon falls in with a cabal of posh, reckless girls—the B4—who turn her quaint fantasies into an erotic and dangerous rush through the darkest realms of friendship and love.”
("When Study Abroad Goes Wrong")

The city of Grifonia, Italy, is swarming with secrets—thousands of years of dark, murderous secrets. Taz, a British student who has just arrived for her year abroad, thinks that she will spend her time in Italy sipping wine and taking in the rolling Umbrian hills. But she soon falls in with a cabal of posh, reckless girls—the B4—who turn her quaint fantasies into an erotic and dangerous rush through the darkest realms of friendship and love.”

("When Study Abroad Goes Wrong")

"I think corridos may have everything to do with why I became a writer. I didn’t grow up reading, or dreaming of becoming a writer someday. When I was a child, the only book we kept in the house was a Bible, and maybe an incomplete set of encyclopedias, and the random picture book that was never returned to the library. Corridos were my father’s music, and often, after a night of drinking, he’d come home with a friend or two and as I lay in bed, I could already hear that first note, long before it came booming through my bedroom door. One after another, the corridos came blaring and I listened to the stories they told. There were ballads of love and betrayal, tales of men placing bets at the horse races and cockfights, stories of men hijacking trains, men who had saddled their horse and set off across the desert without stopping until they reached the border, men who had driven contraband to the other side only to find that someone had already put the finger on them.”
"Ballads of Love and Betrayal" 

"I think corridos may have everything to do with why I became a writer. I didn’t grow up reading, or dreaming of becoming a writer someday. When I was a child, the only book we kept in the house was a Bible, and maybe an incomplete set of encyclopedias, and the random picture book that was never returned to the library. Corridos were my father’s music, and often, after a night of drinking, he’d come home with a friend or two and as I lay in bed, I could already hear that first note, long before it came booming through my bedroom door. One after another, the corridos came blaring and I listened to the stories they told. There were ballads of love and betrayal, tales of men placing bets at the horse races and cockfights, stories of men hijacking trains, men who had saddled their horse and set off across the desert without stopping until they reached the border, men who had driven contraband to the other side only to find that someone had already put the finger on them.”

"Ballads of Love and Betrayal" 

"It was about giving a twist to the natural and known world, a way of making it fictional and distorted. The style worked well for The Southern Reach Trilogy because the writing does something similar, it’s about bending the rules of what we know is possible to create something fictional, Area X, the border…" 
“Foreign Editions: The Southern Reach Trilogy - Jeff VanderMeer in conversation with Pablo Delcán”

"It was about giving a twist to the natural and known world, a way of making it fictional and distorted. The style worked well for The Southern Reach Trilogy because the writing does something similar, it’s about bending the rules of what we know is possible to create something fictional, Area X, the border…" 

Foreign Editions: The Southern Reach Trilogy - Jeff VanderMeer in conversation with Pablo Delcán”